Posts in Category: Afloat! 2017-2019

Plans for a chart table and running water installed!

Foot pump and faucet for water

Steve reserved a lovely piece of teak (salvaged from an old wardrobe a couple of years ago) for the chart table. After cutting to size we spend time checking out how best to design this area to accommodate storage for charts and books, the switch panels, VHF radio etc. We count how many switches we’ll need, and it’s more than the old 8-gang panel, so another item on the ‘research’ list of those more expensive items, along with the fridge options which we’ve been thinking about for a long time having discovered that a small one can cost as much as a huge domestic fridge freezer, and then there’s the issues of keeping it charged without draining the batteries . . .

From chart tables to plumbing . . . We decided a long time ago to have a water tank, rather than water carriers. Installing the foot pump and faucet came to the top of the ‘to do’ list – after several discussions and trial runs about where to site them, or even to abandon the plan altogether!

After connecting the foot pump and experimenting with the faucet, Steve came up with the ingenious idea to secure it to the bulkhead where it’s at the right height and can be twisted out of the way when not needed. After a bit of testing for water levels, the pump works perfectly to fill the kettle and washing up bowls. We’re not having a sink with plug hole, preferring the ‘bucket and chuck-it’ option. We’re not re-installing the heads either to keep the number of ‘through the hull’ holes to a minimum.

Lots of sparks in the engine bay

Checking out the engine

Not enough space for the pipe!

What was wrong with the engine when we went out in the river?

On closer inspection, it looks like the exhaust pipe is restricting the drive lever. There isn’t really much space and Steve decides to cut a notch in the metal frame the engine rests on. Like much of the boat, it’s over-engineered, so, with lots of sparks and noise he cuts it away making space for the pipes and good clearance for the drive lever.

It will need another test out in the river, but experiments driving forward and back in the berth put our minds at rest it’s neither the engine itself nor gearbox that is the problem.

Sorted!

Into the river, with sails

After a great week cruising with the gaffers, spending the last two nights in Ipswich, the passage back to the Deben aboard ‘Kestrel’ was cancelled due to severe weather warnings. James spent the night at Pin Mill and we returned to Woodbridge by car, tidied up the boat and drove back to Derbyshire late Sunday afternoon. After a week at home we return to Suffolk for the Tidemill annual barbecue on 11 August. Jim joins us for the evening and enjoys an afternoon on the river with Steve, sailing ‘Cachalette’ right back to her berth astern of ‘Cachalot’.

We’ve been checking the tides carefully this week as it’s Springs allowing us just over three hours to go out and back over the Tidemill YH bar during the daytime. The weather looks to be set fair too for a short trip out in the river to pick up a buoy and hoist the sails. It would be good to have another pair of hands and by chance, Leigh pops round to say he may be around to help after collecting his boat from the Orwell. So, today’s the day we go out in the river (with sails) for the first time!

The decks are cleared and everything stowed neatly in the cabin, sails are made ready, fenders cleaned of all the slimy sea squirts that have clung to them and off we go as the mark on the bar just covers 1.5m at 1400. Gently does it, but what’s happened to the engine? It’s making a horrible noise and Bev is keen to return to the marina. However, Leigh and Steve listen, take a careful look and decide it’s OK to continue with our project down river . . . we motor down past Loders Cut and pick up a buoy. We play for a while with the mainsail then motorsail back with the staysail.

  • Leigh and Steve set out from the Tidemill
  • Picking up a buoy
  • What are they looking at?
  • Checking out the mainsail
  • Mainsail hoisted

We need to make sure to get back over the bar by just after 1700. Bev takes the helm on the return trip and motors upriver, over the bar and into the marina, doing well until the last turn into the berth, when a sudden gust of wind knocks her completely off course . . . thankyou, Leigh and ‘Mrs Brown’ (Richard and Eileen) for helping to get us safely back into the berth with damage to nothing but Bev’s confidence. Once the engine’s fixed, we need to practise tight manoeuvres under power.

 

Bev goes sailing while Steve ticks off more jobs

Through the deck fittings for navigation gear

Bowsprit ready for use

After a few days in Derbyshire, we’re back in Suffolk for the OGA Summer Cruise. After a passage race on Friday, 20 July and the East Coast Race on the River Blackwater the following day, the week’s cruise ends with a parade of sail up the River Orwell today. ‘Cachalot’ isn’t ready to take part, so Bev crews with James on ‘Kestrel’.

While Bev’s out sailing, Steve gets on with fitting out with evening trips to various locations to join the Gaffers by car. The work is made harder by the blistering heat and lack of shade, but he manages to to get a lot done including installing the VHF radio and navigation lights, setting up the Wykeham Martin jib furling gear, bobstay, bowsprit shrouds and anchor (without the newly-acquired winch, for now).

He spends an enjoyable couple of days with Steve, from Ratsey’s, who’s visiting the Tidemill YH on holiday from the Isle of Wight and also repairs another area of winter damage where the new capping rail has split. All these ‘little jobs’ take time, and it’s sometimes hard to see progress, despite ticking them off the list!

Fixing the damage to the capping rail

First look at the sails

A happy man with his sails!

Bending on the mainsail

Having collected the sails in their smart red Ratsey & Lapthorn bags, we wait for a windless day to have a good look at them . . . hoping we’ll be able to bend on the mainsail whilst she’s still in her berth. Despite a short ‘blow’ at just the wrong moment, the sail is laced to the gaff and mast then flaked successfully without any mishaps.

Bev has repaired the very old mainsail bag found on the boat when we bought her. It will have to do for now – but a new one is on the list of ‘nice to haves’ for the future . . . more pressing is to measure up for ‘lazy jacks’. With the size of the loose-footed mainsail, they’re pretty essential!

We leave the other sails for now, as there’s a bit more work to be done on the bowsprit before setting the jib and we’re heading back to Derbyshire for a long weekend.

A day out shopping and cleaning the bilge!

A trip to the chandlery

After just over a week at home, catching up with life in Derbyshire, jobs around the house and getting the OGA Gaffers Log to press, we return to Suffolk  with the promise that the sails will have been brought to Suffolk Yacht Harbour for our collection on Monday.

As she seems to be taking up, Bev is tasked with cleaning the bilge and we drain it completely, fingers crossed she’s settling down now!

We’ve been doing lots of research into all the other ‘bits and pieces’ we’ll need, so combine the trip to collect the sails with quite an expensive visit to the chandlery, funded in part by Bev’s first State Pension payment! A special purchase, along with the essentials like the radio and water pump is a fine new clock with matching barometer. We also call at Larkmans to order cordage for halyards and sheets . . . lots of it!

Messing about in the river!

Having been a bit neglected for a couple of years, ‘Cachalette’ has been on the front patio this Spring and is looking good as new! With help from Toby, Hugo and Joe, she was ‘launched’ over the wall and onto the road, then towed down to Woodbridge at the beginning of June.

She’s now in the Marina . . . and Steve tries out the outboard, but decides it’s much too heavy! When the wind and tide are right, ‘Cachalette’ is certainly a distraction from jobs still to do on ‘Cachalot’.

What about an outboard?

Looks as good as new!

Enjoying a sail in the sunshine

What about the galley?

Where to put the stove?

Looking down into the forepeak

We’re getting used to being back in the water now, and at high water can walk across the pontoon back to the bank where the tent was for the past ten years.

During a short trip home to catch up with some finishing touches on the ‘house’ project Steve completes the winter maintenance for ‘Cachalette’. He also prepares the remaining larch planking for use in making the interior.

The bunks are now in place so it’s time to make decisions about the galley, chart table and final positions for the batteries, fuel cylinder for the Taylors stove, pump for the water, switch panel, VHF radio and storage options. There are limited choices, but we spend quite a bit of time thinking through various ideas, and trying the stove in different positions.

Ready for visitors!

Finally, with the stove now in place, it’s great to cook with everything we need on board, rather than rustle up a meal in the van that can then be transported down to the boat at any time of the tide!

Our first guest to eat aboard is Claudia, but there’s still plenty more to do on the ‘fitting out’ front . . . so the list is still very long. We ponder, and sometimes joke about Rik’s wry comment when he came aboard before the launch last summer. “Now we will find whether Steve is a boatbuilder, or a sailor!”.

Repairs to the winter damage

Repairs, rubbing down and more varnish

Lists, and more lists . . . what to do next? Now she’s back in the water, and seems to be taking up OK with the bilge pumps kicking in at ever increasing intervals, Steve asks himself, “What are the priorities for ‘fitting out’?”

The damage caused by the winter storms is top of the list, after fitting the base for the second bunk, so we can both sleep aboard in comfort. The broken porthole is polished up, reglazed and re-fitted. All the damage to the deck and coach house roof are also made good and repainted.

He decides that the mast will be OK, bearing the scars of the winter storm, but the bowsprit is taken ashore for rubbing down and another coat of varnish.

Back in the water, at last!

Those best made plans . . . we were the third boat due in the travel hoist on Tuesday. First it was the Dunkirk Little Ship from Ramsholt, ‘Maid Marion’, who had been leaking badly since going back in the water after her winter ashore. She was coming up to the Tidemill to hang in the hoist while her seams were recaulked. Was this an omen? The next boat, ‘Rosebud’, was being lifted out as she was leaking badly and needed to come ashore for repairs.

Once ‘Maid Marion’ had set off back to Ramsholt and ‘Rosebud’ was settled on her cradle, it was our turn. Andy and Steve loaded her into the hoist and drove her down to the dock, Steve climbed aboard and she was lowered into the water . . . he went below, and after some time came out with a worried look. There’s a small waterfall from one of the seams and the pumps won’t take it. What to do?  After a bit of consultation, it’s agreed we can stay out in the hoist overnight, recaulk and be ready to go back early in the morning.

Steve rakes out the offending seam (yet another different one, quite low down) and leaves it to dry overnight . . . we sleep in the van and at 6am Bev wakes to hear the gentle knocking of a caulking iron. By 8am when Steve and Andy arrive, she’s ready. We’ve asked to borrow a mains pump this time, just in case. Second time, and there’s just a trickle as expected, so Steve motors round to our berth.

As Bev waits on the pontoon to take the lines, he seems to be going very slowly – no, he’s aground as it’s still low water! Gently does it and eventually she’s secure in her berth, back on the arm below where the tent was. We’re expecting more visitors today, Joe and Angela are coming down from Derbyshire for a couple of days, so we book a table at the Anchor and Steve sits on board to check the bilge pumps are doing their job.